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PHILOSOPHY SUBJECTS IN THE UNDERGRADUATE CORE CURRICULUM

The Philosophy subjects in the Core Curriculum are designed to assist students in developing habits of critical and creative reflection on their personal, social, religious, and ethical experiences. All four courses are taken during the last two years of college. The final examinations in these courses take the form of an oral defense of thesis statements. Past syllabi and thesis sheets can be found at the department. Some recent syllabi are also at opensyllabus.org.

Ph 101   PHILOSOPHY OF THE HUMAN PERSON I (3 units)

After an initial discussion of the nature of philosophy, students are immediately provided with opportunities to reflect on the distinctive experiences of being human: embodiment, freedom and knowledge, historicity and temporality, death and the Absolute.

Ph 102 PHILOSOPHY OF THE HUMAN PERSON II (3 units)

 
COURSE OFFERINGS
ELECTIVES

Ph 100 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHICAL RESEARCH (3 units). An initiation to the life of philosophical reflection.

Ph 110 PHILOSOPHY SEMINAR (3 units). Review of the major philosophical disciplines with a view of integrating the studies of the philosophy majors, among themselves and with the life-situation of the Philippines today. The course requirements include a synthesis paper and comprehensive oral examinations or a defense of a thesis before a panel of examiners.

Ph 111 HISTORY OF ANCIENT INDIAN THOUGHT (3units). Survey on Ancient Indian thought a detailed study of the Isha and Chandogya Upanishads, the Gita and excerpts from Shankara.

Ph 112 HISTORY OF ANCIENT CHINESE THOUGHT (3 units). This is a survey of Ancient Chinese thought including a meditative study of the classical texts in translation: The Four Books (The Great Learning; The Doctrine of the Mean; The Analects of Confucius; The Works of Mencius), as well as the Tao Te Ching and the writings of Chuang Tzu.

Ph 113 HISTORY OF MODERN INDIAN THOUGHT (3 units). A survey of the six orthodox systems of Indian philosophy and a study of the philosophies of Sri Aurobindo, Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan and Mahatma Gandhi.

Ph 114 HISTORY OF MODERN CHINESE THOUGHT (3 units). A survey of Neo-Taosim and Neo-Confucianism as well as the philosophies of China in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Ph 115 HISTORY OF IDEAS: WESTERN I (ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY) (3 units). The course studies Greek and Roman philosophy with an emphasis on Socrates, Plato and Aristotle.

Ph 116 HISTORY OF IDEAS: WESTERN II (MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY) (3 units). The course discusses the Post Roman and Middle Ages with emphasis on Augustine, Anselm, Bonaventure, and Thomas Aquinas.

Ph 117 HISTORY OF IDEAS: WESTERN III (MODERN PHILOSOPHY) (3 units). The course spans the 16th to 19th century and tackles the following topics: Descartes' Meditations, Hume, Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, and Post-Kantian Philosophy.

Ph 118 HISTORY OF IDEAS: WESTERN IV (CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY) (3 units). Discussion of the following topics: living thought of the 20th century. Phenomenology, Existentialism, Hermeneutics, Language Philosophy.

Ph 119 NEO-PLATONISM (3 units). A Survey of the philosophical systems of Plotinus, Areopagite, John the Scot Erigena, and Marsilio Ficino.

Ph 121 AUROBINDO (3 units). A study of his works.
 
Ph 122 KIERKEGAARD (3 units). A study of his works.
 
Ph 123 MARCEL (3 units). A study of his works.
 
Ph 124 SARTRE (3 units). A study of his works.
 
Ph 125 HEIDEGGER (3 units). A study of his works.
 
Ph 126 TEILHARD DE CHARDIN (3 units). A study of his works.

Ph 127 MERLEAU-PONTY (3 units). This is a discussion of the main themes of the phenomenological philosophy of Maurice Merleau-Ponty by making the students acquainted with his main work, The Phenomenology of Perception.

Ph 128 HEGEL (3 units). This course attempts an understanding of his thought by an analysis of a selection of primary texts and available English translations of the same. (For graduate students and senior philosophy majors only).

Ph 129 MARX (3 units). Using a selection of available primary sources in English translation, an attempt is made here at an understanding of Marx's program of humanism. This entails a discussion of the roots of context, such philosophical Marxian concepts as species-being, alienation, fetishism of the commodity, surplus value, revolution and communism shall be discussed and evaluated.

Ph 130 PEIRCE (3 units). The course aims to present through the study of primary sources some of the main themes of Charles Sanders Peirce's philosophy: pragmatism, theory of scientific method, evolutionism, realism.

Ph 131 THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (3 units). This is a philosophical theory of knowledge. The student is expected to reflect on what knowing is, on the benefit that knowing brings to the knower, on the role of the community and of the knowable in this activity. Toward what should we direct our inquiry? How does the object of our quest affect the method we use?

Ph 132 METAPHYSICS (3 units). This course leads the student to insights into the dynamic structure of esse as encroaching on the knower, the transcendent structure of 'esse': Being as One, True, Good and Beautiful.

Ph 133 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (3 units). A study of the mode of knowing which is modern science, and of the way scientific knowledge relates to mans other ways of knowing and experiencing. A genetic approach is employed: i.e., the roots and the meaning of modern science are sought in the historical development of the ideal science. The focus is primarily on the natural sciences, with an attempt to show how the social sciences have evolved by using the natural sciences as a model or paradigm. The current question of the role of creativity or genius in scientific discovery and revolution concludes the course.

Ph 134 PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE (3 units). Twentieth century development of analytic philosophy of language from its beginnings in Russell and Wittgenstein. Three major periods are distinguished and evaluated: the logical atomism of Russell and Wittgenstein, the logical positivism of the Vienna Circle, and the ordinary language philosophy of the period following World War II. The latter is studied most intensively and its impact on contemporary thought in numerous areas is explored and evaluated.

Ph 135 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC (3 units). This course includes Denotation and connotation of terms, the categorical proposition, immediate inference by deduction and opposition; mediate inference, the categorical and hypothetical syllogisms, fallacies; predicables; induction, argument by analogy; science and hypothesis.

Ph 136 SCIENCE AND RELIGION (3 units). A discussion of contemporary issues in the dialogue between science and religion.

Ph 137 WITTGENSTEIN�S MATURE PHILOSOPHY: MEANING AS USE (3 units). Wittgenstein, the philosopher who has had a significant impact on twentieth-century thought, published only one major work, the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (1921), the single most influential work of Logical Atomism. For Wittgenstein himself, however, the Tractatus contained the seeds of a return to metaphysics and to ordinary language as the primary source of philosophical inquiry. His Philosophical Investigations (1953) became the cryptic and much disputed "bible" of the third "school" of linguistic philosophy: ordinary language philosophy. It is to this last, mature Wittgenstein that the present course is devoted.

Ph 138 SAINT AUGUSTINE (3 units). Study of Augustine's philosophical doctrine in its historical order and the influence of Augustinianism on later thought.

Ph 139 PHILOSOPHY OF THE STATE (3 units). Study of man as a political being. Reflection on political reality, its nature, its immanent finality, its value for man. The three major political problems of our time: confrontation of moral systems brought about by modern communications, the conflict between the ethos of the community and the requirements of modern technology, the need for a world state due to closer interdependence among nations.

Ph 140 KANT (3 units). A study of Immanuel Kant's critical and transcendental philosophy as found mainly in his three Critiques. After a systematic presentation of his doctrine, the course will go through selected texts of Kant aimed to bring the student in direct contact with Kant's basic concepts and principles. Finally, the course will try to show the place that Kant occupies in the history of philosophical thought, and by the same token, give a critical evaluation of his philosophy.

Ph 141 PLATO (3 units). A seminar method will be followed which will aim at the discussion of each dialogue on its own terms. Topics will include: the significance of the dialogues as a literary and philosophical form; the role of myth and symbol in Platos thought, the moral-social-political problematic of Socrates; language and the creation of the polis; the image of man culminating with a discussion of the Republic.

Ph 142 PHILOSOPHY OF WORK (3 units). This course discusses work as a collaboration of human beings in transforming nature's meaning and finality. The changes modern technology has brought about in man and in nature. The problems these changes pose concerning the meaning, value, and finality of modern work.

Ph 143 PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY (3 units). The cyclic and vectorial viewpoints of humans as historical beings. The meaning of the vectorial viewpoint for the Philippines as society-in-transition.

Ph 144 PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIETY (3 units). This course is about the following: phenomenology of social existence; aspects of human co-existence: ambiguity of social structures and power; family, education, historical communities, economic-scientific-technological structures, the state and the problem of violence.

Ph 145 ADVANCED PHENOMENOLOGY (3 units). This is a study of the basic writings of phenomenologists from Husserl to Ricoeur. But especially, the use of Phenomenology in philosophy and its inter-disciplinary relevance.

Ph 146 CONTEMPORARY CRISIS OF REASON (3 units). Discusses the tension between the classical ideal of reason and modern scientific ideals from Husserl or Ricoeur.

Ph 147 CONTEMPORARY ATHEISM (3 units). This course is a survey of the philosophic basis of todays Atheism, including an inquiry into the background, main trends, and particular orientations.

Ph 148 PROBLEM OF GOD IN EXISTENTIALIST LITERATURE (3 units). This is a seminar that will read and discuss selected works concerned with the problem of God in 19th and 20th century existentialist writers. In particular Kierkegaard, Dostoyevsky, Nietzsche, Camus and Sartre will be considered. The seminar is primarily intended for philosophy and literature majors but could also be of interest to students of theology and the history of ideas.

Ph 149 ARISTOTLE (3 units). Study of Aristotle's works as an attempt to work out in detail a conviction of a structure in everything. In living things (on parts of animals), in the cosmos (Physics), in the human as human (on the soul), in human thought as enmeshed with the cosmos (Prior and Posterior Analytics), in the metalogical (Metaphysics) and finally an attempt to find an unstructured structure in human action (The Nichomachean Ethics).

Ph 151 SCHELER (3 units). A study of his works.

Ph 152 PHILOSOPHY OF ART (3 units). Introduction to basic and traditional concerns of aesthetic judgement, aesthetic appreciation, taste, genius, the artistic process, the (im)possibility of universal judgements and the role of culture and class background in criticism. Readings will range from Plato and Aristotle to Kant and Nietzsche.

Ph 153 RICOEUR (3 units). Philosophy, in order to be authentic, must aspire to be a wisdom that speaks to give meaning to the life of a whole people. Taking as inspiration the insights of Paul Ricoeur, this course aims to help in the urgent task of national reconstruction by reflecting on the meaning of responsibility and hope, justice and peace, service for and solidarity with the people.

Ph 154 PHILOSOPHY OF WOMAN (3 units). Different views on women by thinkers like John Stuart Mill, Simone de Beauvoir, etc.

Ph 155 BUDDHIST THOUGHT (3 units). An introductory course to the study of classical Buddhism. The main focus of this course will be the more philosophical work of the Buddhist classics: The Dhammapada. A survey of the historical development of Buddhism Theravada, Mahayana, Chan, tibetan and Zen Buddhism will be taken.

Ph 156 PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVES (3 units). Seminar course which aims to study in depth a particular interest relating to various dimensions of human existence and the history of ideas: Theory and Practice of Non-Violence, Modern Jewish Thought, Physics and Philosophy, Hermeneutics and Contemporary Literary Theory, Gnostic Thought, etc.)

Ph 157 PHILOSOPHICAL TOPICS (3 units). A seminar course which aims to stuy in depth a particular problem in systematic philosophy or the history of philosophy. Examples of such problems include: The Mind-Body Problem, Alternative Logics, the Notion of Christian Philosophy, Evolution, Dialectic and Analogy, The History of the Transcendental ego, etc.)

Ph 158 CRITICAL THEORY (3 units). An analysis of pathological distortions in social life from the perspective of repression and communicative rationality. As a mode of social analysis it aims to emancipate human beings from social structures that alienate them from their freedom and rationality.

Ph 159 WOJTYLA (3 units). A study of his philosophical texts.

Ph 160 BUSINESS ETHICS (3 units). Discussion and case studies of contemporary moral controversies in business.

Ph 161 PHILOSOPHY OF CUTURE (3 units). A discussion on the role of philosophy in cultural processes and the influence of culture in the historical development of philosophy.

Ph 162 LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY (3 units). This course utilizes a literary approach to philosophy and a philosophical approach to literature.

Ph 163 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS. (3 units). A discussion of the environmental issue from an ethical standpoint. It will focus on the problem of man�s relationship with nature.

Ph 164 ADVANCED AESTHETICS (3 units). Contemporary approaches to art and critical position of art in contemporary philosophy and culture. Modern and post-modern perspectives will be introduced.

Ph 165 FOUCAULT (3 units). A study of his works.

Ph 166 PHILOSOPHY AND FILM (3 units). Discussion of film as a way of introducing philosophical ideas philosophical perspectives in analyzing films.

Ph 167 ARENDT (3 units). This course is a study of Hannah Arendt's primary texts.

Ph 168 POSTMODERNISM (3 units). Discussion of the "Deconstructive turn" in contemporary philosophy. It is also a continuation of the impulse of critique and counter-critique in post modernism.

Ph 169 HABERMAS (3 units). A study of his works.
 
Ph 170 NIETZSCHE (3 units). A study of his works.

Ph 171 POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3 units). An analysis of basic political concepts and its applications to contemporary issues: the state and civil society, technocracy, consumerism, and the private and public spheres.

Ph 172 WEIL (3 units). A study of the works of Simone Weil.
 
Ph 173 LEVINAS (3 units). A study of his works.
 
 
MAT

Ph 266 S - Logic. Denotation and connotation of terms, the categorical proposition, immediate inference by eduction and opposition; mediate reference, the categorical and hypothetical syllogisms, fallacies; predicables; induction, argument by analogy; science and hypothesis.

Ph 267 S - Philosophical Anthropology. A philosophical study of man taking as its point of departure a historical study of the body and soul problem in Western thought from pre-historic myth to modern phenomenology, existentialism and positivism. The impact of modern psychological theory on the problem of free will and determinism.

Ph 215 S - Survey of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. An introductory course in the thought, methodology and contemporary relevance of the major figures in Greek and Medieval Philosophy. Stress in the former period on the Pre-Socratics, Plato and Aristotle; in the latter period on Augustine, Anselm, Bonaventure and Aquinas. Study of original texts complemented by major commentaries.

Ph 201 S - Metaphysics. The course aims to provide a hermeneutical and Heideggerian perspective to the "end of metaphysics" phenomenon in Western philosophy. It attempts to look at the metaphysics of St. Thomas as an exception to this metaphysical tradition.

Ph 202 S - Theory of Knowledge. Study of the scope and limits of human knowledge. Problems raised by the new insight from phenomenology, analytic philosophy and philosophy of science on the nature of human knowing.

Ph 268 S - Survery of Modern Philosophy. Sixteenth to Nineteenth century philosophy. A survey of the works and thought of Descartes. Hume. Kant. Hegel.

Ph 269 S - Fundamental Ethics. The phenomenology of moral experience. The structure constitutive of moral experience, i.e. man as negativity, man as openness-in-the-world-with-others, man as openness to being or to the Transcendent. Moral experience and moral conscience. Morality and temporality; morality and historicity; morality as personal. Areas of contemporary moral conscience.

Ph 269 S(2) - Fundamental Ethics (Ibana). Historical and thematic approaches to teaching ethics in the undergraduate level. The course will revolve around the philosophical foundations and the practical applications of ethical theories to contemporary moral problems.

Ph 204 S - Philosophy of Religion. The critical inquiry into the nature of "philosophy of religion". The problem of God's existence. How modern phenomenology of religion casts light on the history of how men think of God. Some major contemporary figures in the discipline. The problem of creation. Evolution viewed in the perspective of the problem of creation.

Ph 204 S (2) - Philosophy of Religion (Rosario). The problem of God as a human problem. The various approaches to the problem of God: pre-philosophical and philosophical approaches. The evolution of the philosophical approach from the cosmological to the personalistic. The range of human knowing with respect to God. Contemporary atheism. The meaning of God for man. 

Ph 270 S - Survey of Contemporary Philosophy. The "masters of suspicion" and the emergence of "philosophy as the conversation of mankind." Is post-modernity really the fate of contemporary philosophy?

Ph 270 S (2) - Survey of Contemporary Philosophy (Reyes). Major 20th century thinkers: Nietzsche, Marx, Husserl, Wittgenstein.

Ph 242 S - Seminary in Teaching Philosophy.

Ph 271 S - Social Philosophy. The course is a variety of philosophical approaches to social reality: personalism, phenomenology, critical theory, transcendental thomis. Philosophers to be read include Max Scheler, Jurgen Habermas, Michel Foucault, Norris Clarke and John Rawls. Special attention will be given to the pedagogy of a course on social philosophy (analysis of newspapers, exposure trips, discussion groups, etc.). Topics to be discussed include "civil society," "solidarity," "marginalization," "participation," "empowerment," "human right to development," and "environmental ethics".

 
REQUIRED SUBJECTS IN M.A.

Ph 200 Methods of Research. Drawing up and use of bibliographies. Textual criticism. How to view a philosopher within his cultural and historical context, in the context of the actual historical problems he is trying to answer. How the intellectual temperament of a philosopher should, to a great extent, dictate the methods of research into his thought.

Ph 201 Advanced Reflexive Metaphysics. Study of the basic works of the originators of this method in philosophy from Marechal to Lotz, especially the actual use of the reflective method in philosophy.

Ph 202 Theory of Knowledge. Study of the scope and limits of human knowledge. Problems raised by the new insights from phenomenology, analytic philosophy and philosophy of science on the nature of human knowing. 

Ph 203 Philosophy of Man. A philosophical study of man taking as its point of departure a historical study of the body and soul problem in Western thought from pre-historic myth to modern phenomenology, existentialism and positivism. The impact of modern psychological theory on the problem of free will and determinism.

Ph 204 The Philosophy of Religion. A critical inquiry into the nature of "philosophy of religion." The problem of God's existence. How modern phenomenology of religion casts light on the history of how men think of God. Some major contemporary figures in the discipline. The problem of creation. Evolution viewed in the perspective of the problem of creation.

Ph 205 Contemporary Atheism. A survey of the philosophic basis of today's Atheism, including an inquiry into the background, main trends, and particular orientations.

Ph 206 Contemporary Crisis of Reason. Discusses the tension between the classical ideal of reason and modern scientific ideal from the philosophic point of view. New forms of logic, Science and Philosophy.

Ph 207 Philosophy of Work. Work as a collaboration of man with man in transforming natures meaning and finality. The changes modern technology has brought about in man and in nature. The problems these changes pose concerning the meaning and value, and finality of modern work for man.

Ph 208 Philosophy of the State. Study of man as a political being. Reflection on the political reality, its nature, its immanent finality, its value for man. The three major political systems brought about by modern communications, the conflict between the ethos of the community and the requirements of modern technology, the need for a world state due to closer interdependence among nations.

Ph 209 Contemporary Ethical Problems. Some reflections of contemporary thinkers on the ethic dimensions of the human person, freedom and the structure of moral values. A reflective analysis of some of the ethical questions raised in contemporary Philippine society.

Ph 210 Advanced Phenomenology. A study of the basic writings of phenomenologists from Husserl to Ricoeur. But especially, the use of Phenomenology in Philosophy and its inter-disciplinary relevance.

Ph 211 Philosophy of History. The cyclic and vectorial viewpoints of man as historical being. The meaning of the vectorial viewpoint for the Philippines as society in transition.

Ph 215 A Survey of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. An introductory course in the thought, methodology and contemporary relevance of the major figures in Greek and Medieval Philosophy. Stress in the former period on the Pre-Socratics, Plato and Aristotle; in the latter period on Augustine, Anselm, Bonaventure and Aquinas. Study of original texts complemented by major commentaries.

Ph 219 Plato.   A study of the Socratic dialogues. A seminar method will be followed which will aim at the discussion of each dialogue on its own terms. Topics will include: the significance of the dialogues as a literary and philosophical form; the role of myth and symbol in Plato's thought; the moral-social-political problematic of Socrates; language and the creation of the polis; the image of man culminating with a discussion of the Republic. Of interest to students of literature and history as well as philosophy,

Ph 220 Saint Augustine. Study of Augustine's philosophical doctrine in its historical order. Question of Augustinian metaphysics. Influence of Augustinian metaphysics.





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