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Curriculum
List of Required Subjects:

FOR ALL BFA MAJORS:

FA 101 Introduction to Aesthetics
An introduction to the elements and principles of the aesthetic experience in the visual arts, performing arts and literature, as well as an examination of the varieties of aesthetic norms and standards

FA 102 Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Arts
An introduction to the relationships that exist among the arts and such disciplines as philosophy, sociology, history, economics, and psychology among others, as well as the precise ways in which art studies have been enriched by this interaction.

FA 198 Practicum I
The first of two creative or academic projects under the supervision of a faculty member.

FA 198 Practicum II
The second of two creative or academic projects under the supervision of a faculty member.



MAJOR SUBJECTS FOR CREATIVE WRITING:

FA 105 Introduction to Literature and Creative Writing
A study and appreciation of selected creative and critical texts, e.g. poetry, fiction, drama, non-fiction, purple criticism, and literary translation.

(choose two writing seminars)

FA 106 Writing Seminar: Fiction
Lecture and discussion on the reading and writing of fiction as well as on a variety of subject matters from the point of view of fiction writers.

FA 107 Writing Seminar: Non-fiction
Lecture and discussion on the reading and writing of non-fiction as well as on a variety of subject matters from the point of view of non-fiction writers.

FA 108 Writing Seminar: Poetry
Lecture and discussion on the reading and writing of poetry as well as on a variety of subject matters from the point of view of poets.

FA 109 Writing Seminar: Drama
Lecture and discussion on the reading and writing of plays for radio, stage, screen, or television as well as on a variety of subject matters from the point of view practitioners of that genre.

FA 110 Writing Seminar: Translation
Lecture and discussion on the practice of translation as well as on a variety of subject matters from the point of view of practitioners of translators of literature.

(choose two writing workshops from the same genre)

FA 111.1 - 111.4 Writing Workshop: Fiction I-IV
Discussion of student works on fiction in small and large groups, under the guidance of a teacher who is also a writer of fiction. Students also write new fiction and consult the teacher individually. Each student submits a collection of works of fiction at the end of the semester.

FA 112.1 - 112.4 Writing Workshop: Non-fiction I-IV
Discussion of student works on non-fiction in small and large groups, under the guidance of a teacher who is also a writer of non-fiction. Students also write new works and consult the teacher individually. Each student submits a collection of works of non-fiction at the end of the semester.

FA 113.1 - 113.4 Writing Workshop: Poetry I-IV (choose one)
Discussion of students' poems in small and large groups under the guidance of a teacher who is also a poet. Students also write new poems and consult the teacher individually. Each student submits a collection of poems at the end of the semester.

FA 114.1 - 114.4 Writing Workshop: Drama I-IV
Discussion of students' plays for stage, television and/or the cinema, in small and large groups, under the guidance of a teacher who is also writes plays. Students also write new plays and consult the teacher individually. Each student submits at least one play at the end of the semester.

FA 111.1 - 111.4 Writing Workshop: Translation I-IV
Discussion of students' translations, in small and large groups, under the guidance of a teacher who is also a translator. Students also translate works and consult the teacher individually. Each student submits a collection of translations at the end of the semester.



MAJOR SUBJECTS FOR THEATRE ARTS:

FA 136.1 Theatre History and Literature: Survey of Theatre History and Dramatic Literature
A survey of the major events, problems and concepts of theatre history and theory, and of major movements, playwrights and works at historical junctures.

FA 137.1 Theatrical Performance: Acting 1
The fundamentals of acting, including movement, vocal production and the interrelation between these. Exercises include improvisation, sound and movement exercises, voice and speech training, tension release, exploration of stage space, and text work.

FA 137.3 Voice, Movement and Mime
An integrated course in voice and stage movement with an introduction to mime. Exercises in the expressive use of the body and of stage space are combined with exercises to develop vocal quality, clarity, and projection.

FA 138.1 Directing I
A course on the theories and principles of directing, starting with the director's approach to text interpretation and visualization. Student directors learn to analyze plays, mount scenes, apply the principles of blocking, and plan a production.

FA 139.1 Theatre Design: Production Design
An introduction to the elements of stage design, -- set, costumes, lights - as well as their execution in the context of a particular production or dramatic text.

FA 140.1 Theatre Technology: Technical Theatre
An introduction to theatre crafts and other technical aspects of theatre work - lights, sounds, set and costume work, props and masks, make-up and others.



MAJOR SUBJECTS FOR BOTH VISUAL ARTS COURSES:

FA 165.1. Introduction to the Visual Arts
A basic course designed to develop an appreciation of the visual arts (mainly painting, sculpture and architecture) by understanding the elements of pictorial design (line, color, space, shape, etc.) and the principles of visual composition (units, emphasis, coherence, repetition and variation, among others). An interdisciplinary approach will be used to establish correspondence among the visual arts (including film), music and literature. Discussion as well of the cultural, philosophical, religious and ideological assumptions underlying key historical developments in Western art-making (i.e. painting and sculpture) from ancient to modern times.

FA 165.2. Introduction to Philippine Visual Arts.
A historical survey of Philippine visual arts from the 19th to the post war era. It includes the anonymous artists of the colonial Spanish period and the Damian Domingo, Malantic, Flores, the Asuncion brothers, Loxano, Luna and Hidalgo; the artists of the American period, De la Rosa, Amorsolo and Pineda; Edades and the Neo-Realists of the post war era. It then continues with the abstractionists, folk moderns, Social Realists and mixed media/installation artists of various schools from the 1960s to the present. Assignments include the critique of works from the permanent collection of the Ateneo Art Gallery.

(choose one from the FA 167 series)

FA 167.1. Narratives of Western Art
A critical introductory survey of the key styles and the history of Western painting, sculpture and architecture, beginning in the Byzantine period, and covering the Gothic, Renaissance, Mannerist, Baroque, Rococo, Neo-Classical, Romantic, Impressionist, and Post Impressionist periods. At the end of the course, students are expected to be able to identify key works and themes. Assessment through essays and two slide tests in the course of the semester.

FA 167.2. Survey of World Art
A survey of the history and development of painting, sculpture, architecture, and related visual arts of major world cultures, including European, American, Asian, African, Islamic, and Pre-Columbian.

FA 167.3. The Arts of Asia
Perspectives on the Arts of China, Japan, India, and Southeast Asia to the Present.
In this subject, students will be exposed to the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which the arts of the region have been created, in the light of both pre- and post-colonial experiences.

FA 167.4. Introduction to Modern Asian Art
A survey of modernist developments in the painting and sculpture of India, China, Japan, South Korea and Southeast Asia, excluding the Philippines --Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Vietnam.

FA 167.5 Philippine Indigenous Art
A survey of themes and motifs in Philippine indigenous art. Starting from pre-Hispanic examples, the course compares and contrasts local forms and styles in different ethnolinguistic and geographical settings, upland and lowland, to reveal the richness of Filipino cultural heritage.

FA 167.6 Philippine Colonial Art and Architecture
The sources, influences and the social and religious factors that shaped Philippine colonial art of the Spanish and American periods; the principal examples from the 17th to the 20th centuries, comparative studies with Mexican and South American colonial and the Beaux-Arts movement in the United States are the topics of this course.

FA 167.7. Philippine Christian Art
Starting with choice Philippine examples from Spanish colonial art, the roots and influences that shaped Philippine Christian art are explored. The relation of these artistic expression to Christian worship is underscored and the uniqueness of the Philippine experience is highlighted. Topics include: Seeing as an intellectual and religious discipline; Expressive space; Religious, Christian and Liturgical art; Liturgy and the arts; Periods in the development of Christian art; Rise and growth of Philippine Christian art; Art documentation.

FA 167.8. Development of Architecture in Southeast Asia
The focus is on the development of architecture, both domestic and religious, in Thailand, Vietnam, Indonesia, Sulu-Marawi, and Lowland Luzon-Visayas. The course explores the characteristics of the indigenous house on stilts and its interaction with the High Cultures; the Indic, Sinic , the Islamic, and the Western. While it was transformed by those High Cultures, I in turn transformed them. The adaptations of the ecclesiastical styles brought in by the High Cultures, to environment and culture, will also be discussed.

FA 167.9. Motifs and Themes of Southeast Asian Art
There are recurring motifs and themes in Southeast Asian art than transcend the urban traditions (Indic, Sinic, Islamic, and Western) that influenced it. Examples would be the snake/crocodile, the diamond pattern, the house-on-stilts, the tattoo as a source of power. These motifs and themes have modified the various urban traditions that entered into Southeast Asia' at the same time, they have been modified by these urban traditions.

FA 167.10. Special Topics in Art History: Western Art
Key themes and motifs in western art history. Seminars on specific material and ideological conditions within a given historical period in western art permit students to deepen their knowledge of art history under the guidance of the instructor.

FA 167.11. Special Topics in Art History: Eastern Art
Key themes and motifs in eastern art history. Seminars on specific material and ideological conditions within a given historical period in eastern art permit students to deepen their knowledge of art history under the guidance of the instructor.

FA 167.12. Special Topics in Art History: Philippine Art
Key themes and motifs in Philippine art. Seminars on specific material and ideological conditions in Philippine art across historical periods allow students to acquire greater familiarity of the Filipino cultural heritage in the visual arts.

FA 167.13. Special Projects in Art History
Selected issues and problems in art theory and history. Seminars, workshops or internships enable students to pursue issues and problems in art history through a variety of media under the supervision of the instructor.



MAJOR SUBJECTS FOR ART MANAGEMENT:

(choose one from the FA 166 series)

FA 166.1. The Art of Our Time: From Modernism Onwards
This course examines the interrelationship of visual representation with the transformation of the social, political and cultural construct of society in the 20th century, It surveys Late Expressionism, and the early avant-garde movements such as Futurism, Dada, Surrealism and Cubism. Tracing the emergence of Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, and Pop Art, and moving through Arte Povera and neo-Expressionism, The Art of Our Time introduces postmodernism in terms of cont4mporary theory, and new technologies and practices.

FA 166.2. Analysis of Visual Images
Theory in all academic disciplines has been dominated by models that use language rather than the picture as the guiding paradigm. This course moves the picture to a more central position and argues that how pictures work in perceptual and cognitive terms must be balanced by a study of the relationship between social/political power and the power of images. Thus, image analysis draws not only from art theory and history, but also from psychology, semiotics, sociology and related cultural theory.

FA 166.3. Genres of Writing on Art
A more focused study of the methods of art writing for different cultures and audiences. Students will be expected to acquire the ability to write extended captions, educational and press kits, scholarly catalogue entries, and critical art reviews. Students will participate fully in the editing, writing, design, production and distribution of Artline, the newsletter of the Ateneo Art Gallery.

FA 166.4. Iconography and Literature
An introduction to the relationship between the visual and literary arts. Using examples from Eastern and Western art, the literary background of these works will be analyzed as hermeneutic devices to understand and appreciate visual art works, and in turn the visual arts as interpretations of literature. Topics range from Graeco-Roman mythology to Filipino artists like Luna, Amorsolo, Botong Francisco and Rizal.

FA 166.5. Issues in Philippine Contemporary Art
Seminars on present-day developments in Philippine art seen from a multiplicity of disciplines. Among the issues covered are the interfaces of theory and artistic production, festivals, biennales and globalization, and the complex relationships that exist between the State, museums, commercial art galleries, artists, collectors and the public. Resource speakers from these sectors will be invited.

FA 166.6. Special Topics in Art Theory I: Western Art
Key themes and motifs in western art. Seminars on specific ideas and movements on given historical junctures in western art permit students to deepen their knowledge of art theory under the guidance of the instructor.

FA 166.7. Special Topics in Art Theory II: Eastern Art
Key themes and motifs in eastern art. Seminars on specific ideas and movements on given historical junctures in eastern art permit students to deepen their knowledge of art theory under the guidance of the instructor.

FA 166.8. Projects in Art Theory
Selected issues and problems in art theory and history. Seminars, workshops or internships enable students to pursue issues and problems in art theory through a variety of media under the supervision of the instructor.

FA 168.1. Art in Context: Profession and Practice
This course examines the various professional practices open to arts practitioners outside its actual production. Applying basic principles of management theory and practice, students will be able to examine the professional skills and knowledge-based tasks that they will need for their internship. These include aspects of curatorship and connoisseurship, genres of art writing, documentation, basic care and maintenance of art, and marketing and promotional strategies (invitations, sponsorship, media releases, etc.) In addition to the completion of assigned written work, students will be given the opportunity to apply these skills in a final project which will involve mounting an exhibition of works by students enrolled in the introductory painting course.

FA 168.2. Approaches in the Production of Art
A studio and lecture course which familiarizes students with the materials and techniques of art practitioners for the purpose of art appreciation rather than mastery of technique. It is envisioned to provide them with the insight and the understanding of day-to-day "industry" production issues that art management professionals are expected to engage with on a regular basis.



MAJOR SUBJECTS FOR MULTIMEDIA DESIGN:

(choose one from the FA 170 series)

FA170.1. Design and Visual Culture
Introduction to design awareness; role of designer in contemporary culture; emphasis on visual literacy and perception, creative problem solving, and design culture.

FA170.2. Elements of Visual Communication
The course explores the creative process of making images that can move ideas and information to the minds of others. The general principles studied and practiced in these courses are the foundation of creative thinking and successful solutions for graphic design, illustration, and advertising art direction communication problems.

FA170.3. Elements of Visual Language
This course is intended to develop a common design vocabulary for students who do not already have a background in Graphic Design. It will not offer a canon of design rules, but is meant to foster an understanding of essential design elements. Class exercises will minimize the expressive aspects so as not to override the design basics. The production work undertaken will be focused on the computer. Some areas covered include: line, composition, texture, proportion, weights, volume, space; the psychology of received images; light; typography; symmetry; legibility; and abstract representation.

FA170.4. Digital Art
The course will provide students with an opportunity to see and recognize works of art created with new technologies. The goal is to develop one's own critical eye, to learn how to analyze, evaluate, and perhaps even to create works of art with the new instruments now available to artists. The class will study several contemporary artists whose expressions rely on new technologies with a view toward examining how the computer is an instrument for creativity.

FA170.5. Introduction to Computational Media
This class is about computer programming concepts. The main question asked is how does computer programming create nonlinearity and interactivity and how can this be applied to communication and expression. The class covers four programming concepts, if statements, repeat loops, variables and routines. The end of the semester is spent developing an idea for a final project and implementing it using computer programming skills.

FA170.6. Special Topics in Visual Design
An advanced study in a particular area of visual design in consultation with a faculty mentor. Written, signed contract required prior to registering for this course.

FA170.7. Special Projects in Visual Design
This course prepares the student for the professional world through the creation of the superb quality art work which will comprise the student's portfolio. The student is acquainted with the fundamental business practices necessary to find an entry level position in the field. Students may also be provided with the opportunity to work in conjunction with not-for-profit organizations to conceptualize and if necessary, produce graphic pieces for their portfolios. Participation in this course requires departmental selection and approval.

(choose one from the FA 171 series)

FA171.1. Computers and Visual Design
An introduction to the computer as a creative tool. Use and exploration of specific software and hardware applications in the context of art and design. Practical instruction combined with theoretical perspective to investigate the impact of visual computing on the design process.

FA171.2. Digital Studio
A studio-based course emphasizing the acquisition of theoretical and practical skills required to work in digital environments and communities. Students engage with basic concepts and overviews of digital practice, acquire an understanding of the critical contexts and communities in which it can be situated, communicate with the Internet and the local area network, and learn the basics of a broad range of drawing, imaging, multi-media and publishing applications.

FA171.3. Design Media
Understanding of color, composition and form as ways of communicating design concepts and content. Media and photography as tools for all design students: color theory and mixing, variety of materials and media, introduction to the camera.

FA171.4. Digital Design Procedures
This course offers basic instruction in complex computer pre-press and hand presentation skills. Computer production techniques as well as hand-crafting presentation skills are taught in the context of simulated professional job processes. Development of basic skills to technically produce publications in the graphic design and advertising professions, to provide instruction of publishing methods, and to develop an understanding of how technical processes relate to the creative design process.

FA171.5. Foundation Drawing
Observational drawing course where students develop skills by completing sequential drawing problems and exploring a variety of drawing media, especially computers. Problems are designed to explore five basic strategies of seeing: the perception of edges, shapes and space, relationships and proportions, light and shade, and gestalt and wholeness. Critical thinking and analysis of drawing are developed throughout the course.

FA171.6. Typographic Design
With the use of actual typographic design situations, the course instructs the student in the use of type as a basic element of graphic communication, including principles which determine typeface selection (to visually communicate the desired effect) and the appreciation of letterforms. Typesetting and typographic layout on the computer are stressed and practiced in the classroom.

FA171.7. Multimedia Procedures
An introductory course designed to provide students with hands-on experience using various technologies (online communities, digital imaging, audio, video, animation, authoring environments and the World Wide Web.) The course explores forms and uses of new communications technologies in a laboratory context, and how these can be employed in a variety of multimedia applications.

FA171.8. Special Topics in Design Procedures
Independent or group study involves the student(s) in selected design procedure problem which may involve data bases and software applications. Supervision is done by a faculty member, with internships conducted with an outside agency

FA171.9. Special Projects in Design Procedures
Students have the option of earning a three units of credit per semester while gaining valuable work experience in a creating design procedures for outside companies or offices.. The work arrangement must be formalized by a written agreement between the student, the workplace, and the school.

(choose one from the FA 172 series)

FA172.1. Basic Graphic Design
The study of the design process and its conversion into graphic communicative forms. utilizing the computer. Introduction to the principles sequencing, structure, typography, symbol design, and color. Exploration of the creative display, organization and communication of ideas and information through word and image. Although presentation on the page or video monitor is very important, the primary focus is on the development of the content of the communication.

FA172.2. Advanced Graphic Design
Continued study of design in communication, combining theoretical studies with applied problems in graphic design. These are term-long projects dealing with specific issues such as design history, information graphics, environmental design, letterform construction, electronic imaging, conceptual bookmaking, video/film graphics, motion graphics, interactive media, community action, and narrative structures.

FA172.3. Creating Websites
This course will facilitate the creative use of the WWW as a medium for new artistic, journalistic, personal, and commercial projects. Students will be expected to design and implement one or more web sites of their own and to demo their works-in-progress frequently. Students may be asked to work in groups, write essays, and participate in investigative exercises

FA172.4. Advanced Web Design
A plethora of sites now exist- but which are the compelling ones? What web experiences capture the minds and hearts of their visitors and why? This class will examine various types of sites-informational, transactional, online communities, narrative experiences and fan sites to determine what their attraction is and for what audiences. Students will work in teams to plan, design and construct a project for the web. Starting from a simple concept and going through rounds of conceptual and design development, students will produce and realize the vision of their site.

FA172.5. Video for New Media
Video is an essential tool of new media. This production class deals with the fundamental elements of video making: video and audio basics, planning, interviewing, shooting and editing (both analog and digital, using Adobe Premiere and After Effects.) This class will also explore decision-making for video in a variety of formats, from linear video to multimedia and desktop video.

FA172.6. Experimental Digital Video
How do we capture space? How do we make self-portraits? How is artistic vision communicated? This course explores digital video by considering the urge to capture and re-present. Focus will lie on the subjective, considering issues such as point of view, scale, time and space. Within the context of collage, we will use layering and stylistic juxtaposition to create a larger whole from smaller parts, with the Quicktime Movie serving as the common denominator. The first part of the semester is based on creating compelling content. The second part focuses on compositing and authoring, making use of DV editing stations to produce full screen, full motion video.

FA172.7. Digital Sound Lab
Advances in the field of digital sound have placed the art of soundtrack production directly into the hands of the artist. In this course, students learn the skills needed to create and produce a digital soundtrack. Topics include digital editing and sampling, mixing and MIDI. Students learn basic and advanced concepts in audio production, and are expected to produce soundtracks of both artistic interest and exceptional sound quality for their own media projects.

FA172.8. Interactive Computing in Public Places
The course will explore the design of place-based interactive computing systems in museums, visitor centers, stores and other public spaces. Focus is on the challenges designers face when creating public space interactives that require little to no learning curve. The class will be presented with a series of design 'problems' and required to develop an array of concept alternatives for each.

FA172.9. Small Scale Game Programming
This class is for students who are interested in interactive programming particularly as it applies to creating games. The class focuses on practical computer game development through structured programming exercises, along with concept exercises, and analysis. Students will learn how to program various types of games, such as text-based games, puzzle games, action and arcade games, as each type of game offers different programming challenges. For the final project, students will come up with an original game concept, and then convert their vision into an actual, playable game.

FA172.10. Computer Animation.
Introduction to art and technique of animated computer graphics. Exploration of computer multimedia technologies with emphasis on the development of personal artistic expression.

FA172.11. Special Topics in Design Production
Independent or group study involves the student(s) in a self-directed production project to develop or demonstrate practical abilities. Supervision is done by a faculty member, with internships conducted with an outside agency

FA172.12. Special Projects in Design Production
In their junior or senior years, students have the option of earning a specified number of credits while gaining valuable work experience in an area appropriate to their studies. The work arrangement must be formalized by a written agreement between the student, the workplace, and a faculty advisor.




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